Call 020 8088 9012
Quick Call Back

Name

Telephone Number

Email Address

Best time to contact

Call 020 8088 9012
3let Our Charity Partner Reg Charity No. 1095197
Call 020 8088 9012
Quick Call Back

Name

Telephone Number

Email Address

Best time to contact

guaranteed rental schemes | The Unwinding: An Inner History of the New America by George Packer – review

guaranteed rental schemes | The Unwinding: An Inner History of the New America by George Packer – review

We will regularly inspect your property, to ensure it is well-maintained and that everything is as it should be, ready for when you do get a tenant again. We will also continue to advertise your property, to show it to prospective tenants and to keep you informed every step of the way. And you can relax knowing that all the while this property is empty, you are still guaranteed rent payments and are still receiving a monthly guaranteed rental income.

guaranteed rental schemes

George Packer does a fine job of charting US decline. But where’s the anger?

History of disassemblage': The US flag fades along with a wall in Calvert, Texas. Photograph: Jill Stephenson /Alamy guaranteed rental schemes

One of the odd things about American news programmes is how little American news they feature. Typhoons and hurricanes, crazies and lone gunmen, Barack Obama staging a press conference, 10 seconds about the Middle East, a famous actor doing something scandalous, back to the weather: all this giddy fragmentation is further punctuated by so many commercial breaks or mentions of what’s coming up after those breaks that it can be hard to tell the difference between reportage and retail. America itself – its landscapes, rhythms, textures – is more invoked than evoked. A mere brand or sign. A tool to manufacture a togetherness that doesn’t exist.

George Packer’s new book is about this missing America. Spanning three decades, it’s a history of disassemblage, a chronicle of a nation where the “structures that had been in place before your birth collapse like pillars of salt across the vast visible landscape – the farms of the Carolina Piedmont, the factories of the Mahoning Valley, Florida subdivisions, California schools”. It’s also a threnody, a lamentation about the silence, at least in political circles, around those collapsing structures: “An old city can lose its industrial foundation and two-thirds of its people, while all its mainstays – churches, government, business, charities, unions – fall like building flats in a strong wind, hardly making a sound.”

Packer, a staff writer at the New Yorker and author of The Assassins’ Gate, a 2005 study of the US war in Iraq, is also a novelist. The Unwinding is strongly influenced by the USA trilogy (1930-36) of John Dos Passos, a political radical in his early days and a literary modernist, who famously claimed that “Mostly USA is the speech of the people”.

Like him, Packer constructs his factual narrative from the stories of a broad range of characters: Madison-raised Dean Price is hauled out of his mixed high school by his racist father, weans himself on self-help books and opens up a slew of truck stops, convenience stores and burger joints before becoming an evangelist for biofuel. He is equal parts dreamer, indomitable entrepreneur, utopian Del Boy.

Then there’s Jeff Connaughton, an idealistic lobbyist, White House lawyer and former aide to Joe Biden who recalls in savage detail how his initial admiration for Obama’s vice-president turned to disgust, not just because of Biden’s foibles (cribbing from a Neil Kinnock speech, mistreating people close to him) but more importantly because of his absolute failure to push through legislation that would have broken up those national banks whose greed and corruption brought America to the brink of economic meltdown. Packer has a great deal of time for these men, and for Tammy Thomas, a black American woman from Ohio who grew up taking care of an alcoholic mother who was in and out of jail for drugs, fraud and robberies. Somehow, in spite of the steel mills in her home town closing down and having to raise her children in a gang-colonised neighbourhood, she becomes a community organiser. Less warmly – though by no means acerbically – portrayed is Peter Thiel, a billionaire venture capitalist and libertarian co-fou

nder of PayPal, who finances projects involving seasteading and reversing human ageing.guaranteed rental schemes

Like Dos Passos, Packer interlaces these stories, themselves recounted in small sections, with “newsreels” in which the mood of a particular year – or rather the hysterical sound-and-fury of its public discourse to which his own subsequent stories offer a more considered, infrasonic counterpoint – is jerry-built from newspaper headlines, tweets, television listings and pop lyrics. Also, again like Dos Passos, he includes potted and sometimes vinegary biographies of various American public figures including Jay-Z, Oprah Winfrey, Colin Powell, conservative activist Andrew Breitbart and, a little puzzlingly, the writer Raymond Carver. These can be damning. Of Newt Gingrich, married to Jackie though widely known to be a philanderer, he writes: “He tried to keep it to oral sex so he could claim literal fidelity if anyone asked but within two years the marriage was over, another adoring woman about to become the next Mrs Gingrich, the advocate of civilisation standing at Jackie’s hospital bed as she lay recovering

from uterine cancer, a yellow legal pad with divorce terms in his hand.” Mostly, though, they feel like material worked up from magazine profiles or overambitious efforts to anatomise a nation through its celebrities.

guaranteed rental schemes

Packer isn’t too clear about when “The Unwinding” took place. At one point he asks if it began with the end of the Reagan recession in 1982 and the bubbles – bond, tech, stock, housing markets – that followed. Was it caused by the deindustrialisation of the 1970s? Many of the factories that disappeared for ever were “hot, filthy, body-and soul-crushing” but they offered decent wages and a sense of belonging – to a community, a class, a nation – since extirpated. Or were its seeds planted in the 1950s – a decade of unrivalled middle-class prosperity – with the rise in car ownership and shopping malls, developments that would contribute to the decline of Main Street as both a real and symbolic common space?

Packer sometimes channels and sometimes overlays the voices of his confidants to point the finger at various modern criminals: lobbyists, Wall Street bankers, cynical politicians. But though he talks about how Washington was “captured” and ventriloquises Connaughton’s growing disenchantment by talking about how “everything he had learned in law school… was bullshit”, he doesn’t name names and, like the sonorous and stylistically adept New Yorker writer he is, mostly keeps his anger in check.

Yet the subtitle of The Unwinding – An Inner History of the New America – brings to mind JG Ballard’s notion of “inner space”. Deploying delirially anti-humanistic prose, Ballard drew on his fascination with America’s dark psycho-interiorities to produce extraordinarily prophetic publications such as Why I Want To Fuck Ronald Reagan as early as 1968. Equally, The Unwinding could have learned from the roiling prose-fire of Rolling Stone journalist Matt Taibbi who likened Goldman Sachs to “a great vampire squid wrapped around the face of humanity, relentlessly jamming its blood funnel into anything that smells like money”.

Packer’s book – so decent, meticulous, concerned – reads like both a shrine to and the embodiment of a form of civics that barely exists in America these days. Is lambent lamentation enough?

View the original article here

Our rent guarantee scheme provides you with between 1 to 5 years worth of guaranteed rental income. What’s more, there’s no catch and no fees involved. Contact Guaranteed Rental today on 020 8088 9012 to find out more.

guaranteed rental income insurance | Watch Jeb Bush and beware politicians bearing books

guaranteed rental income insurance | Watch Jeb Bush and beware politicians bearing books

We seek properties all over England for our guaranteed rent scheme. All properties must be clean, in a good state of repair, fit for human habitation and safe. If they are not we may be able to help you anyway so it is worth giving us a call.

guaranteed rental income insurance

Politicians’ books are worthless pap, but as Jeb Bush shows, a pile of books beats a soapbox for improving one’s standing

Former Florida governor Jeb Bush signs his book, Immigration Wars: Forging an American Solution, at the Ronald Reagan Library. Photograph: Brian Cahn/Zuma Press/Corbis guaranteed rental income insurance
Jeb Bush left office six years ago, at the age of 54, and basically, has not held a job since. There was talk of him stepping forward to help rescue the Republican party from its 2012 hopeless slate of candidates, but he demurred. And there was talk about him becoming the National Football League commissioner at the tail end of his term as Florida governor, but Bush said he wouldn’t even consider his next career step until he was out of office.

He decided, evidently, to do – at least, officially – almost nothing at all.

Until now. Now, he has co-written a book, Immigration Wars: Forging an American Solution. On Sunday, he did all the morning talk shows. He’ll be talking about this book for months and months to come.

And that’s what this column is about: books by politicians. Books as political career-building blocks. Books as legitimizing devices. Books as political objects.

It is as expected as kissing babies that a politician who is aspiring to national office will write a book. Beside me, at my desk, for reasons I can’t fathom, has been Mark Rubio’s face for the last several months, on the cover of his book. Everybody who is going to run for president in 2016 will have a book. Maybe two.

I think we can all safely agree that no one, except perhaps the emotionally disturbed, has ever read one of these books. It transpired during the Republican race last year that Rick Santorum had not quite read his own book. It is not a requirement, or even an expectation, that ambitious politicians write their own books.

Barack Obama wrote a revealing book before he was a plausible contender, before he was likely at all to be anyone, and he probably wrote it himself. Then, after he became a viable candidate, he wrote another, probably much less by himself, which carefully said nothing at all.

Still, these dishwater dull and insipid books are powerful. This is effective media.

In Jeb Bush’s case, a book wipes his indolence clean. The man might reasonably be hardpressed to explain just exactly what he was doing for the past six years, and on what basis was he supporting his family (which would open up the issue of sweetheart consulting deals and overpaid speeches). But having a book, especially on a policy topic, shows he was being an expert, pursuing the public’s welfare, solving problems, that he was out-front, that he was leading. To prove it, he wrote a book.

His book, as these books are, is one moderately diligent speech and the rest is almost wholly valueless padding.

The core material itself – the basic stump speech, which he will now repeat at forum after forum – is hardly all that interesting. Bush tries to walk the fine line between Republican troglodytes who oppose all immigration reform, and the obvious necessity for a more tolerant position. In this, he offers a series of banal and slightly more tolerant policy proscriptions.

But pay no attention to that, because no one will. Rather, the point is that because of this book, which no one will read or seriously review, Jeb Bush is now a spokesman for this issue. And that puts him on television as a man with a mission, instead of as a mere candidate. He doesn’t have to say what is obvious (“I’ve just been waiting around for my time to run for president”). He can say, “I’m deeply concerned about immigration.”

Still, don’t think a book by a climbing politician is just propaganda. It doesn’t even provide that amount of feeling and commitment. In fact, politicians are really careful to say mostly nothing at all in their books – lest, when they do run, they are held accountable for what they may have written.guaranteed rental income insurance

These books a really more sleights of hand. They’re pretend books. It’s like being named a chairman of a worthy cause. It’s wholly symbolic.

guaranteed rental income insurance

So why do publishers collude in this deception?

For one thing, the publisher doesn’t really have to pay you. You certainly don’t want to look like Newt Gingrich when Rupert Murdoch used his book company, HarperCollins, to funnel an extra $4.5m to Newt. (Indeed, if you hold office, there are no rules governing this sort of thing.)

And you get free publicity. Jeb Bush’s book tour masking as campaign launch will actually sell books. Not a huge number, of course, but perhaps 30-40,000 – that’s a profit of several hundred thousand dollars to a publisher.

Still. Here’s a book without real thought, or information, or meaning, besides self-promotion, which exists only to provide a pretext to get the politician-author on television. You would think a publisher would have some gatekeeper pride before so willingly becoming part of this charade. At least, you might think the publisher would worry about the devaluation these phony books might have on books as a whole. (Really, it’s hard to look at any book the same way, after you’ve tried to read one of these.) But alas …

Curiously, these politicians who have written (or who have had someone else write) these phony-baloney books, actually come to think of themselves as authors, with a stack of new books always at their elbow. It’s almost impossible to visit one of them and not come away with an autographed copy of your own.

So here is Jeb Bush: with his book in hand – his artifact, his prop – on the hustings, surely aiming for his shot.

View the original article here

3Let work hard to deliver the best property management service. We work closely with our landlords and tenants to deliver a personal service tailored exactly to their needs. Contact Guaranteed Rent today on 020 8088 9012 to find out more.

letting agents guaranteed rent | The Clinton model: what the Republican party can learn from Hillary

letting agents guaranteed rent | The Clinton model: what the Republican party can learn from Hillary

If you have a property that you think meets our criteria, contact our teamwhere we will arrange a time to come and talk to you and inspect the property. You decide if you want the building rented for between one and five years. We make formal offers within 24 hours of seeing the property. Please note we require the relevant gas and safety certificates but we can arrange these for you if required.

letting agents guaranteed rent

Four years ago she was beaten and bitter, and now she’s practically a shoo-in for 2016. GOP contenders, take note

Look at Hillary’s shift from sore loser to next-in-line: the way for the GOP to succeed in beating Clinton is learn from her. Photograph: Kevin Lamarque/AFP/Getty Images letting agents guaranteed rent

Newt Gingrich’s declaration this week that “the Republican party today is incapable of competing” against Hillary Clinton should she run for president is, most of all, a statement about Newt Gingrich. That he made the pronouncement on NBC’s Meet the Press was an indication of just how adrift his party is.

The line is a testament to his genius for self-promotion and his ability to attach himself to prevailing winds. I’ve always presumed that Gingrich would be an excellent ambassador to his predicted lunar colony primarily because he only needs publicity, not oxygen, to breathe.

But what does the quote say about Hillary Clinton? Not as much as progressives might hope. Post-giddiness has given way to an atmosphere among Democrats that magnifies all signs of Republican collapse, from the would-be “banishment” of Karl Rove at Fox to the diminishment of Grover Norquist. To be sure, the GOP is struggling with both identity and popularity at the moment, but the operative concept in Gingrich’s formulation isn’t either party but “today”.

Today, the GOP is incapable of beating Hillary, but that doesn’t really matter. Besides, she’s been inevitable before. Indeed, James Carville’s quip on the show – that Democrats “don’t need a primary. Let’s just go to post with this thing” – might just be an indication of his memory for the last time she was a sure thing more than it is a statement of confidence in it this time around. In 2007, she went from inevitable to indefatigable into a period of incredulousness; she was the leader of a presidential primary run so ruthless and mathematically improbable it makes you wonder if she’s given Mitt Romney a condolence call yet.

Remember that? The desperation and lead-footed feints of the too-long-to-die Clinton campaign? Remember the denial of her most fervent supporters (“Party Unity My Ass!”), who couldn’t believe they’d been outstripped by this newcomer, this stranger with a murky past and murkier ideology? (“Birthism”, it may pain you to remember, started with Hillary die-hards.) He must have cheated somehow. The media had it rigged in his favor from the start, anyway.

It sounds familiar, no? Yet out of that mean-spirited funk rose one of the most popular and visible secretaries of state in modern times. Looking at Hillary’s shift from sore loser to next-in-line, one wonders if the way for the GOP to succeed in beating Clinton is learn from her. There are limits to how much a party can emulate a person, of course. It cannot retire to Chappaqua or grow its hair out.letting agents guaranteed rent

But there are some clues from Hillary’s journey that Republicans – certainly individually, if not as a party – can follow.

letting agents guaranteed rent

1. Start now. Hillary’s speech at the 2008 convention threw all in for Obama and at the same time celebrated the idea of “never stopping”. There’s a tradition of coyness in presidential runs that runs right through to Hillary today, but if the GOP wants to dramatically change its fortunes, why not be dramatic? Encourage hopefuls to announce their intentions, let the American people start to get to know who they are, especially if those contenders put themselves in the public eye via their work and not media appearances. Which brings us to:

2. Create policy, not catchphrases. Clinton gives good speeches. Not great speeches, and she probably realizes that. Her rise as secretary of state hasn’t been on the back of rhetoric (unlike some presidents I could name), but distinct actions. It’s another tradition for would-be candidates to do tours of various thinktanks and conferences to get themselves in the public eye; Hillary has gained popularity by doing most of her work outside of it. This strategy, applied to GOP candidates, would restrict the field to elected officials and government appointees – which might not be a bad idea for the party to consider. (Cough) Herman Cain (cough).

3. You are not your supporters. Or: lead, don’t follow. The Clinton example here is her deft handling of those disgruntled supporters: she praised their loyalty but didn’t exhibit the desire let their loyalty determine her actions. And she didn’t try to bribe or cajole them into staying with her once she started in a direction they didn’t like. This is how the GOP should approach the Tea Party: So long convinced that it is the sole source of conservative “momentum,” the Republican party seems unwilling to risk seeking support form a more, well, stable base.

Really, every one of these strategies has at its heart a single logic: Putting the country’s, or voters’ interests before one’s own. As a candidate for 2008, Hillary’s negatives came from the perception that she was ambitious for the sake of ambition – she started being cool and more electable and more appealing, almost as soon as it became clear her ambitions was secondary to getting things done.

Thus far in our short post-election season, the Republican party has shown little interest in getting things done – and a lot entitlement.

View the original article here

rent guarantee scheme – Do you want to receive monthly rent even when the property is unoccupied?. Please contact us on 020 8088 9012 for extensive references to see how we can help you today.

Customer Testimonials for our Guaranteed Rental Scheme